Electrical Safety Council launches at House of Commons

A new and independent driving force in electrical safety launched on Wednesday 26th April at the House of Commons.

The Electrical Safety Council, designed to increase public awareness and provide advice on electrical safety issues, is the result of a review by the NICEIC which separates the organisation's charitable and commercial activities.

The charity has been set up with the consumer in mind and it will also work across the electrical industry representing consumer interests. It will provide independent and impartial technical advice on all matters relating to the safety of electrical installations and electrical equipment.

Emma McCarthy, director of the Electrical Safety Council, said: "We aim to be the most influential and respected driving force for consumers in the field of electrical safety. We want to work in partnership with the electrical and building services industries, accident prevention groups and Government, to develop strategies to help those using electrical products and installation services to understand the associated risks."

David Pollock, director of the Electrical Contractors' Association (ECA) said: "The ECA welcomes the launch of the Electrical Safety Council, which will clarify the distinction between the commercial and charitable functions of the Group. The Electrical Safety Council should play a pivotal role in promoting electrical safety issues to the public, complementing and reinforcing the efforts of the ECA and the other industries bodies that support it. We look forward to working together with the Electrical Safety Council on a number of issues."

Recent research carried out in by the Electrical Safety Council points to a lack of awareness of electrical safety issues among the public. Over 40% of the population have never had their electrics checked and almost a quarter (24%) of people do not know how old their wiring is. Although, every year, over 30* people are killed and nearly 4000* are injured as a result of electrical accidents and fires in the home, a significant minority of people (28%) would not be prepared to pay for their electrics to be checked by a registered electrician.

Emma McCarthy, director of the Electrical Safety Council said: "Electricity is an integral part of our lives, but it can kill. Our message will be to advise the public not to simply wait for a problem with their electrics before doing something about it."

Electrical Safety Council